Tag Archives: mercy

Ruth Bryan – Letters – 1850-1851 – (1)

The great enemy would suggest that you are too filthy for the fountain, too cold for the fire, too much diseased to appear in the presence of the great Physician. He does this in a wily way, bringing to mind, when you would approach the mercy-seat, some shortcoming or misdoing, in order to turn your eye away from that sprinkled blood which is the sinner’s all-prevailing plea. May the Comforter reveal Christ, as He convinces of sin, and take of His precious things–and set them against your vile ones, giving you heavenly skill and understanding to plead–His precious blood against your sin–His perfect obedience against your constant disobedience–His power to heal against your desperate disease.

Robert Hawker – A Prop Against All Despair – 1831

A PROP AGAINST ALL DESPAIR, INTENDED FOR THE CONSOLATION OF SELF-CONDEMNED SINNERS IN GENERAL, BUT MORE ESPECIALLY FOR THOSE PERISHING SOULS WHO FEAR THAT THEY HAVE SINNED BEYOND THE POSSIBILITY OF PARDON.

“I even I (saith God) am He, which blotteth out thy transgressions for mine own sake, and will not remember thy sins.” (Isa. xliii. 25.) ” For mine own sake, even for mine own sake will I do it, saith Jehovah. For my name’s sake will I defer mine anger, and for my praise will I refrain for thee, that I cut thee not off.” (Isa. 48:11, 9.) Do you feel astonished at this? The Lord appears to have expected you should…while we were yet sinners,” rebels, and enemies to God by wicked works, ” Christ died for us.” (Rom. v. 8.) And if the mind stands astonished, as well it may, in the view of such unparalleled mercy, the whole terminates in this reply, “I am God and not man.” (Hosea xi. 9.) This answers all objections, and stops every argument, and proves what an apostle hath observed, ” That no flesh shall glory in his presence.” (1 Cor. i. 29.)


Benjamin Morgan Palmer – The Broken Home Chapter 2

A Continuation of the reading of The Broken Home. The following pages are committed to the Press, after no little mental conflict. The stricken deer, says Cowper, withdraws To seek a tranquil death in distant shades :and so the mourner should hide his wound beneath his mantle. But the Free-M asonry of those in sorrow would pour the balm into other hearts which the Spirit of Consolation may have given to each. From the simple desire of comforting those who mourn, this story of repeated bereavements is here told. It is proper to add, that the conversations reported in these sketches are copied verbatim from notes taken at the time. They are recited without enlargement or embellishment, that they may be the more touching from their simplicity. Long-treasured memories are now scattered upon the winds, with the prayer that they may help to bind up the brokenhearted. 

The Broken Home chapter 2