Tag Archives: hardness of heat

Death Bed Terrors of an Infidel or Modern Freethinker 1692

The last awful hours of a young gentleman who departed from the principles of Christianity and turned Deist. ‘That there is a God I know because I continually feel the effects of His wrath. That there is a hell I am equally certain having received an earnest of my inheritance there already in my bosom.’ narrated by Thomas Sullivan

The Death Bed Terrors of an Infidel

George Cheever – Lectures Pilgrim’s Progress-Hill Difficulty

 “But the men told him to take care of himself, and they would take care of themselves; and as to laws and ordinances they should keep them as conscientiously as he; and as to all his pretense of inward experience, the new birth, repentance and faith, and all that, it might do for such a ragged creature as he had been. All the neighbors knew that he had been a worthless wretch, and it was well indeed that he had got such a coat to cover his nakedness; but they had always gone well dressed, and having never been so bad as he was, needed not so great a change; their laws and ordinances would save them.”

The Hill Difficulty

 

Hannah Moore – Do We Love God? Practical Piety 1811

Though we cannot be always thinking of God, we may be always employed in his service. There must be intervals of our communion with him, but there must be no intermission of our attachment to him. The tender father who labors for his children does not always employ his thoughts about them: he cannot be always conversing with them or concerning them, yet he is always engaged in promoting their interests. 

Do We Love God?

John Owen – The Grace and Duty of Being Spiritually Minded Chapter 4

We can have no greater evidence of a change in us from this state and condition, than a change wrought in the course of our thoughts. A relinquishment of this or that particular sin is not an evidence of a translation from this state; for, as was said, such particular sins proceed from particular lusts and temptations, and are not the immediate universal consequence of that depravation of nature which is equal in all. Such alone
are the vanity and wickedness of the thoughts and imaginations of the heart.

The Grace and Duty of Being Spiritually Minded Chapter 4

John Owen – The Grace And Duty Of Being Spiritually Minded Chapter 3

Where prayers are effectual, they will bring in spiritual strength. But the prayers of many seem to be very spiritual, and to express all conceivable supplies of grace, and they are persisted in with constancy, — and God forbid we should judge them to be hypocritical and wholly insincere, — yet there is a defect somewhere, which should be inquired after, for they
are not so answered as that they who pray them are strengthened with strength in their souls. There is not that spiritual thriving, that growth in grace, which might be expected to accompany such supplications.

Grace and Duty of Being Spiritually Minded 3

John Bunyan – The Barren Fig Tree

Well, now the ax begins to be heaved higher.  For now, indeed, God is ready to smite the sinner; yet before He will strike the stroke, He will try one way more at last, and if that misseth, down goes the fig tree.  Now this last way is to tug and strive with this professor by the Spirit.  Wherefore the Spirit of the Lord is now come to him, but not always to strive with man.  Yet awhile He will strive with him; He will awaken, He will convince, He will call to remembrance former sins, former judgments, the breach of former vows and promises, the misspending of former days – He will also present persuasive arguments, encouraging promises, dreadful judgments, the shortness of time to repent in, and that there is hope if He come.  Further, He will show him the certainty of death, and of the judgment to come; yea, He will pull and strive with this sinner.  

The Barren Fig Tree

 

John Owen – Grace and Duty of Being Spiritually Minded 1

Men walk and talk as if the world were all, when comparatively it is nothing. And when men come with their warmed affections, reeking with thoughts of these things, unto the performance of or attendance unto any spiritual duty, it is very difficult for them, if not impossible, to stir up any grace unto a due and vigorous exercise. Unless this plausible advantage which the world hath obtained of insinuating itself and its occasions into the minds of men, so as to fill them and possess them, be watched against and obviated,
so far, at least, as that it may not transform the mind into its own image and likeness, this grace of being spiritually minded, which is life and peace,
cannot be attained nor kept unto its due exercise. Owen

Grace and Duty of Being Spiritually Minded 1

John Owen – A Treatise on Indwelling Sin Chapter 1

Awake, therefore, all of you in whose hearts is any thing of the ways of God ! Your enemy is not only upon you, as on Samson of old, but is in you also. He is at work, by all ways of force and craft, as we shall see.
Would you not dishonor God and his gospel; would you not scandalize the saints and ways of God; would you not wound your consciences and endanger your souls; would you not grieve the good and holy Spirit of God, the author of all your comforts; would you keep your garments undefiled, and escape the woful temptations and pollutions of the days wherein we live; would you be preserved from the number of the apostates in these latter days; — awake to the consideration of this cursed
enemy, which is the spring of all these and innumerable other evils, as also of the ruin of all the souls that perish in this world!John Owen Indwelling Sin Chapter 1