Benjamin Fawcett – The Cure of Spiritual Melancholy – Sections 1 and 2 – 1780

Observations on the nature, causes and cure of melancholy : especially of that which is commonly called religious melancholy
by Fawcett, Benjamin, 1715-1780″

Man is fearfully and wonderfully made, and preserved, and in many instances as wonderfully afflicted. Melancholy is one of those diseases, in which the dispensations of unerring providence
are dark and unaccountable.

Observations on Melancholy, Cure of Spiritual Melancholy 2

Benjamin Fawcett – Obvervations on Melancholy – Cures for Spiritual Melancholy 1780

Observations on the nature, causes and cure of melancholy : especially of that which is commonly called religious melancholy
by Fawcett, Benjamin, 1715-1780″

Man is fearfully and wonderfully made, and preserved, and in many instances as wonderfully afflicted. Melancholy is one of those diseases, in which the dispensations of unerring providence
are dark and unaccountable.

Observations on Melancholy, Cure of Spiritual Melancholy 1

Thomas Halyburton – His Conversion Story – God’s Deliverance

Is this final narration of the memoirs of Halyburton, 1674-1712-  the account is given of his finally being set at liberty from the long battle with conviction, self-examination, and deception. What he learned of the perfect remedy in the gospel and the new understanding he received.  It also contains his account of how he learned to battle indwelling sin.

The Conversion of Thomas Halyburton – The Victory

The Conversion of Thomas Halyburton – 1674-1712 – Conviction of Sin

This contains the details of the conviction of Halyburton just before his conversion. It may be unequalled in its detail of the discovery of the innate depravity and evil inclinations of the natural man to form a profession without experiencing the new birth. In the book it is Part 3, Chapter 1.

The Conversion of Thomas Halyburton 2 of 3

 

 

The Conversion of Thomas Halyburton – 1674-1712 Chapter 1-3

This is the account of the first 3 chapters from the memoirs of Thomas Halyburton. I am making it available again because it is so in depth with the details of his awakening and very helpful for others going through these deep waters. “By the extremity of this anguish I was for some time, about the close of 1697 and beginning of 1698, dreadfully cast down. I was weary of my life. Often did I use Job’s words: “I loathe it, I would not live alway.” (Job vii. 16.) And yet I was afraid to die. I had no rest; “my sore ran in the night;” and it ceased not in the day. (Ps. lxxvii. 2.) At night I wished for day; and in the day I wished for night. (Deut. xxviii. 66, 67.)
I said, “My couch shall comfort me;” but then darkness was as the “shadow of death.” (Job vii. 13, x. 21.) When I was in this case, I was often brought to the brink of despair: “He filled me with bitterness; he made me drunk with wormwood. He broke all my teeth with gravel-stones; he covered me with ashes.”
(Lam. iii. 15.) He removed my soul far from peace: I forgot prosperity. And I said, My strength and my hope is perished from the Lord; remembering mine affliction, and my misery, the wormwood and the gall.
My soul had them still in remembrance, and was bowed in me. (Lam. iii. 16-20.) Now I was made to think it a wonder that I was not consumed; and though I dreaded destruction from the Almighty, yet I could not but justify him, if he had destroyed me:

Conversion of Thomas Halyburton #1

 

T M Sullivan – Pilgrim’s Progress – The Castle of Giant Despair 1

In this study the intense sufferings of Christian and Hopeful are examined and enlarged upon as they were in the dungeon of Giant Despair. The helpful authors quoted are Thomas Goodwin’s Child of Light Walking in Darkness, the musings of William Cowper meditating on his own suicide, and the amazing story of Simon Browne – 1680 – 1732 and how half of his life was spent in the Castle of Giant Despair.

The Castle of Giant Despair

T M Sullivan, Pilgrim’s Progress – Faithful’s Martyrdom in Vanity Fair

In this lesson, the story of the persecution in Vanity Fair is continued.  Judge Hate Good has Faithful put to death.  A discussion of martyrology and persecution historically where is mentioned the Scottish Covenanters in the “Killing Times,” 1660-1668 and the story of John Calas from Foxes’s Book of Martyrs, 1761 is mentioned.

PilgrimsProgress_FaithfulMartyrdom