Category Archives: chastening

Cotton Mather – A Call for a National Repentance – Considerations for a Distressed People

And they gathered together to Mizpeh, and drew water, and poured it out before the Lord, and fasted on that day, and said there, We have sinned against the Lord.  1 Samuel 7:6

“If those defamed servants of the Lord Jesus Christ, will be a little patient, He will at last give an honorable resurrection to their names that had so much dirt cast upon them. When the names of their envious accusers will either lie buried in oblivion or be mentioned no otherwise than Judas in the Gospel, or Pilate in the Apostle’s Creed. ”

A Call for a National Repentance

 

George Whitefield – Don’t Be Discouraged by Scoffs and Contempt of Wicked Men

Let none of these things move you; for, though you are thus treated here, consider, you shall in heaven have no discouraging company, nor any but what will be an assistance to you; you will have no scoffer there, all will be ready to join with heart and voice in your everlasting joy and praises.

Do Not be Discouraged by Scoffing and Contempt of Wicked Men

Richard Baxter – The Right Method for a Settled Peace of Conscience – Introduction 1653

The Right Method for a Settled Peace of Conscience and Spiritual Comfort.  ”  God hath sent me to you, with that joyful message,  which needs no more but your believing entertainment, to make it sufficient to raise you from the dust, and banish those terrors and troubles from your hearts, and help you to live like the sons of God. He commandeth me to tell you, that he takes notice of your sorrows. He stands by when you see him not, and say, he hath forsaken you. He minds you with greatest tenderness, when you say, he hath forgotten you.”

The Right Method for a Settled Peace of Conscience 1

Divine Correction – William Jay of Bath – 1854

This narration is from two sermons (1) Divine Correction and (2) The Unbelief of Thomas, from Collected Works of William Jay Volume 2.  Spurgeon wrote in his autobiography, ”

While I was living at Cambridge, I once heard Mr. Jay, of Bath, preach. His text was, “Let your conversation be as it becometh the gospel of Christ.” I remember with what dignity he preached, and yet how simply. He made one remark which deeply impressed my youthful mind, and which I have never forgotten; it was this, “You do need a Mediator between yourselves and God, but you do not need a Mediator between yourselves and Christ; you may come to Him just as you are.”

Divine Correction / The Unbelief of Thomas

 

Jonathan Edwards – A Warning to Professors

From the sermon, “consider whether you do not horribly defile and profane the public prayers and other ordinances. Notwithstanding all your pretenses, and what you seem to hold forth by your attendance on them, do you not all the while live in known wickedness against God? For all your pretenses of respect to God, of humiliation for sin, and desires to avoid it, have you not come directly from the allowed practice of known sin to God’s ordinances, and did not at all repent of what you had done, nor at all sorry for it at the very time when you stood before God, making these pretenses, and even had no design of reformation, but intended to return to the same practice again after your departure from the presence of God?”

A Warning to Professors

Octavius Winslow – The Cure For Our Love in its Declension. 1847

A chapter from the book, Personal Declension and Revival of Religion in the Soul. ”

When God becomes less an object of fervent desire, holy delight, and frequent contemplation, we may suspect a declension of Divine love in the soul. Our spiritual views of God, and our spiritual and constant delight in him, will be materially affected by the state of our spiritual love. If there is coldness in the affections, if the mind grows earthly, carnal, and selfish, dark and gloomy shadows will gather round the character and the glory of God.

The Love of the Many Waxing Cold

Richard Alleine – A Heart of Flesh – From Heaven Opened

Richard Alleine 1611-1681

O what sorrow-bitten souls are the saints for their want of sorrow. “I mourn, Lord, I lament, I weep; but it is because I cannot mourn or lament as I should: if I could mourn as I ought, I could be comforted; if I could weep, I could rejoice; if I could sigh, I could sing; if I could lament, I could live; I die, I die, my heart dies within me, because I cannot cry; I cry, Lord, but not for sin, but for tears for sin; I cry, Lord, my calamities cry, my bones cry, my soul cries, my sins cry, ‘Lord, for a broken heart,’ and behold, yet I am not broken.

A Heart of Flesh

 

John Angell James – Letters to the 7 Churches Part 2 – from The Church in Earnest.

The church, though in this deplorable state, was not aware of its condition, but thought all was going on well; it did not know that it was “wretched, and miserable, and poor, and blind, and naked.” This is surprising and affecting, and shows, in an alarming view, how far self-deception may be carried, especially in the case of those, who, like the members of the church at Laodicea, are much taken up with the enjoyment of worldly prosperity. Let a professor of religion have his mind much occupied with the cares of business, and his affections much engrossed with the objects of sense, and it is astonishing how ignorant and mistaken he may remain as to the real state of his soul.

Letters to the 7 Churches – The Church in Earnest Part 2

John Angell James – Letters to the 7 Churches from The Church in Earnest.

The book, The Church in Earnest, was a followup book to An Earnest Ministry. It was published in 1850. This chapter is the first part of his exhortations to the churches in Revelation through Thyatira.

Letters to the 7 Churches – The Church in Earnest

Jonathan Edwards – Hope and Comfort Usually Follow Genuine Humiliation and Repentance

 

Souls are wont to be brought into trouble before God bestows true hope and comfort. The corrupt hearts of men naturally incline to stupidity and senselessness before God comes with the awakening influences of his Spirit. They are quiet and secure. They have no true comfort and hope, and yet they are quiet; they are at ease. They are in miserable slavery, and yet seek not a remedy.

Hope and Comfort Usually Follow Genuine Humiliation and Repentance