Category Archives: Puritan

Thomas Watson – The Kingdom of Heaven Taken By Violence

How may one do to offer violence to himself in mortifying the flesh? 1. Withdraw the fuel that may make lust burn. Avoid all temptations. Take heed of that which doth nourish sin. He who would suppress the gout or stone, avoids those meats which are noxious. They who pray that they may not be led into temptation, must not lead themselves into temptation. 2. Fight against fleshly lusts with spiritual weapons: faith and prayer. The best way to combat with sin is, upon our knees.

Taking Heaven by Storm

John Owen – A Real Sense of Sin’s Forgiveness is Rare – Why?

This discovery of forgiveness in God is great, holy, and mysterious, and which very few on gospel grounds do attain unto.

It is, then, no easy thing to make a discovery of forgiveness to a soul, when the work and employment which conscience, upon unquestionable grounds, challengeth unto itself lies in opposition unto it. Hence is the soul’s great desire to establish its own righteousness,

Forgiveness of Sin, The sense of it is rare

 

David Clarkson – 1621-1686 – Christ Seeking Fruit and Finding None

Those whom the Lord has sent into his vineyard, and fitted for that great work, they cannot be satisfied with their wages; no, not that great ‘recompense of reward’ which he has promised them, unless they see the success of their labors. If their hearts be upright before God, and of a temper answerable to their calling, they value nothing like the fruits of their ministry, how much approbation, how much love soever they have, how free and liberal encouragements and supports soever they meet with. ”

Christ Seeking Fruit and Finding Nothing

Puritan Prayers – William Jay, Robert Bolton, Phillip Doddridge and others

This recording is a collection of written prayers that are very edifying. The last is from John Calvin. Many of these were read from first editions made available through the Early English Books Online – Text Creation Partnership, including Henry Bull, from 1566. But they have been read into more modern English. The first two prayers are from the book Family Prayers by William Jay, 1769-1854. Unlike the popular book Valley of Vision, every prayer and author is introduced as to its authorship.

Family Prayers, Puritan Prayers

Alexander Whyte – Sometimes, I would rather DIE than pray.

The meditations of Alexander Whyte are from the writings of Thomas Shepard. 1605-1649. Beeke wrote, When I first read Alexander’s Whyte’s book on Thomas Shepard some 30 years ago, I was frequently moved to tears. This narration includes, I Abhor Myself, The More I do the Worse I am, and It is sometimes so with me I would rather die than pray.

I Abhor Myself AND I would rather die than pray

Tom Sullivan – Pilgrim’s Progress Study – The Character Temporary

The full title of this adult Sunday School lesson is Temporary and the Twofold Working of the Spirit. The Twofold working of the Spirit is the title of a chapter in A W Pink’s commentary on Hebrews where he details the work of the Holy Spirit upon the non-elect. It is also called “The Common Influences of the Holy Spirit. An examination of Thomas Goodwin’s treatise from Works Volume 6 “The Holy Spirit and the Temporary Believer” is also opened up with a story in this lesson also from Davis W Clark’s Deathbed Scenes, 1851 The Apostate.

Temporary from Pilgrim’s Progress

Francis Newport – The Death Bed of a Free Thinker

You need not tell me there is no God for I know there is one, and that I am in His presence! You need not tell me there is no hell. I feel myself already slipping. Wretches, cease your idle talk about there being hope for me! I know I am lost forever! Oh, that fire! Oh, the insufferable pangs of hell!

Francis Newport, 1st Earl of Bradford PC (23 February 1620 – 19 September 1708)

The Death Bed of a Free Thinker

 

 

Gisbertus Voetius – Spiritual Desertion – 1659 – Chapter One, Part One

This book is recorded – {narrated} from the title Spiritual Desertion with the kind permission of the Dutch Reformed Translation Society. www.dutchreformed.org .   It is the narrator’s opinion that it is unequaled regarding the subject in which it treats. The opinion is based on the use of the spiritual/clinical terms that are not even employed in our day. (1) because the relation of Christian experience is often more superficial (2) if the distressed is even asked to delineate them at all – often the feelings are suppressed or there is little patience to deal with these subjects at this level. (3) because the best authors are understood and quoted by this author from a bygone day that even though now are available on line are rarely consulted with the patience that is required to read the old English.  Special thanks to Reformation Heritage Books and my dear friends David Woolin, and Dr. Joel Beeke as well. Chapter one part one is the definition of terms. In this chapter the difference between melacholia and desertion are examined.

Spiritual Desertion – Chapter one Part one

John Owen – – Last Days – Perilous Times

If you will be like the world, you must take the world’s lot. It will go with you as it goes with the world. Inquire and see, in the whole book of God, how it will go with the world, — what God’s thoughts are of the world, — whether it saith not, “If it lies in wickedness, it shall come to judgment,” and that “the curse of God is upon it.” If, therefore, you will be like the world, you must have the world’s lot; God will not separate.

Last Days, Perilous Times