Category Archives: Deathbed Stories

Tom Sullivan – Pilgrim’s Progress Final – Fearful End of Ignorance

In this solemn lesson, the story of the casting out of Ignorance from the gate of heaven is explained. Quotes are given from Jonathan Edwards’s sermon Sinners in Zion Tenderly Warned, John Bunyan’s Barren Fig Tree, or the Downfall of the Fruitless Professor, and Samuel Davies, The Resurrection of the Dead. So as to not leave the hearers in despair, the lesson is finished off with a reading of The Holy War, Emmanuel Addresses the Inhabitants of Mansoul.

The Fearful End of Ignorance

John Warton – Death Bed Scenes – Parental Anger – 1828

From the chapter: “I hastened with them up stairs into the sick man’s chamber. He was not in bed but upright, in a large easy chair, supported by pillows. Without opening his eyes he was aware of my approach, and for an instant ceased to moan. Death sat evidently on his faded and shrunken countenance. I took a seat by his side, and having ascertained by a common question about his situation that he was still able to speak, although in so low and faint a tone that I could not understand him without putting my ear close to his mouth; I directed that all the persons in the room should retire; and I did it aloud, that he might know we were quite alone, and that there might be as little as possible to embarrass him. I then took the dying man’s hand into my own, both because I was in earnest, and because I wished him to think me so — He gave me no sign to encourage me — His hand lay lifeless in mine, whilst I gently pressed it.”

Death Bed Scenes – Parental Anger

John Warton – Death Bed Scenes – Infidelity – 1828

From the chapter, ” Having thus begun with tolerably good omens, I proceeded to inquire about his sickness, expressing my fears that it was both painful and dangerous. In answer he was very communicative; and it appeared that his disorder was distressing in the extreme; a vast mass of water collecting perpetually, and discharging itself through every pore of his body; and his respiration being at times so much impeded, that he had scarcely breath enough to tell me his own story. He had been at the nearest hospital, in an early stage of his complaint, when it seemed to be within the reach of art; but had unwisely returned home, before the proper system was tried, because he was deprived of many little things which he considered essential to his comfort. Since this the disorder had increased rapidly; yet he would not admit any idea of danger. In fact, he was manifestly afraid to die”

Death Bed Scenes – Infidelity 1828