Category Archives: backsliding

Alexander Whyte – Sometimes, I would rather DIE than pray.

The meditations of Alexander Whyte are from the writings of Thomas Shepard. 1605-1649. Beeke wrote, When I first read Alexander’s Whyte’s book on Thomas Shepard some 30 years ago, I was frequently moved to tears. This narration includes, I Abhor Myself, The More I do the Worse I am, and It is sometimes so with me I would rather die than pray.

I Abhor Myself AND I would rather die than pray

John Angell James – Letters to the 7 Churches Part 2 – from The Church in Earnest.

The church, though in this deplorable state, was not aware of its condition, but thought all was going on well; it did not know that it was “wretched, and miserable, and poor, and blind, and naked.” This is surprising and affecting, and shows, in an alarming view, how far self-deception may be carried, especially in the case of those, who, like the members of the church at Laodicea, are much taken up with the enjoyment of worldly prosperity. Let a professor of religion have his mind much occupied with the cares of business, and his affections much engrossed with the objects of sense, and it is astonishing how ignorant and mistaken he may remain as to the real state of his soul.

Letters to the 7 Churches – The Church in Earnest Part 2

John Angell James – Letters to the 7 Churches from The Church in Earnest.

The book, The Church in Earnest, was a followup book to An Earnest Ministry. It was published in 1850. This chapter is the first part of his exhortations to the churches in Revelation through Thyatira.

Letters to the 7 Churches – The Church in Earnest

Tom Sullivan – Pilgrim’s Progress Study – The Character Temporary

The full title of this adult Sunday School lesson is Temporary and the Twofold Working of the Spirit. The Twofold working of the Spirit is the title of a chapter in A W Pink’s commentary on Hebrews where he details the work of the Holy Spirit upon the non-elect. It is also called “The Common Influences of the Holy Spirit. An examination of Thomas Goodwin’s treatise from Works Volume 6 “The Holy Spirit and the Temporary Believer” is also opened up with a story in this lesson also from Davis W Clark’s Deathbed Scenes, 1851 The Apostate.

Temporary from Pilgrim’s Progress

Thomas Sullivan Pilgrim’s Progress – Formalist and Hypocrisy

In this discussion we cover the characters of Simple, Sloth, and Presumption, then Formalist and Hypocrisy.  We also discuss at length the temporary loss of assurance of salvation and distinguish it from God’s hiding of His face from His children to teach them to not live on their frames and feelings.

Pilgrim’s Progress – Formalist and Hypocrisy

Jonathan Edwards – Hope and Comfort Usually Follow Genuine Humiliation and Repentance

 

Souls are wont to be brought into trouble before God bestows true hope and comfort. The corrupt hearts of men naturally incline to stupidity and senselessness before God comes with the awakening influences of his Spirit. They are quiet and secure. They have no true comfort and hope, and yet they are quiet; they are at ease. They are in miserable slavery, and yet seek not a remedy.

Hope and Comfort Usually Follow Genuine Humiliation and Repentance

Archibald Alexander – Christian Sanctification

Gradually the glow of fervent affections subsides. Worldly pursuits, even the most lawful and necessary, steal away the heart; and various perplexing entanglements beset the inexperienced traveler. He begins to see that there were many things faulty in his early course. He blames his own weakness or enthusiasm; and in avoiding one extreme he easily falls into the opposite, to which human nature has a strong bias. He enters into more company with the world and, of course, imbibes insensibly some portion of its spirit. This has a deadening effect on his pious feelings; and his devotions become less fervent and less punctual; and far more interrupted with vain, wandering thoughts, than before. He is apt to fall into a hasty or formal attendance on the daily duties of the closet, and a little matter will sometimes lead him to neglect these precious seasons of grace. A strange forgetfulness of the presence of God, and of his accountableness for every thought, word, and action, seizes upon him. Close self-examination becomes painful and, when attempted, is unsuccessful.

Christian Sanctification

Timothy Rogers – Trouble of Mind and the Disease of Melancholy

Timothy Rogers, English Puritan (May 24, 1658 – November 1728), was the son of John Rogers. His first published sermon was “Early Religion, or the Way for a Young Man to Remember His Creator” in 1683. He fell into a deep melancholy from 1688 to 1690. As a result of his sufferings and the grace of God which led him out of that dark despond, he published four sermons under the title “Practical Discourses on Sickness and Recovery” in 1690, which was followed by A Discourse on Trouble of Mind and the Disease of Melancholy in 1691. He continued to deal with melancholia throughout his life, but also testified to the grace of God working in him unto the end.

Disease of Melancholy and Trouble of Mind

John Owen – Of Temptation Chapter 6 7 8

Let a soul in such an estate awake and look about him. His enemy is at hand, and he is ready to fall into such a condition as may cost him dear all the days of his life. His present estate is bad enough in itself; but it is an indication of that which is worse that lies at the door. The disciples that were with Christ in the mount had not only a bodily, but a spiritual drowsiness upon them. What says our Savior to them? “Arise; watch and pray, that ye enter not into temptation.” We know how near one of them was to a bitter hour of temptation, and not watching as he ought, he immediately entered into it.

Treatise of Temptation Chapters 6 and 7