Category Archives: contrition

John Bunyan – The Story of His Conversion

I had been long vexed with this fear, and was scarce able to take one step more, just about the same place where I received my other encouragement, these words broke in upon my mind, “Compel them to come in, that my house may be filled”; “and yet there is room” (Luke 14:22,23). These words, but especially them, “And yet there is room” were sweet words to me; for, truly, I thought that by them I saw there was place enough in heaven for me; and, moreover, that when the Lord Jesus did speak these words, he then did think of me; and that he knowing that the time would come that I should be afflicted with fear that there was no place left for me in his bosom, did before speak this word, and leave it upon record, that I might find help thereby against this vile temptations. ‘This, I then verily believed.’

The Conversion Testimony of John Bunyan

Richard Baxter – The Right Method for a Settled Peace of Conscience – Introduction 1653

The Right Method for a Settled Peace of Conscience and Spiritual Comfort.  ”  God hath sent me to you, with that joyful message,  which needs no more but your believing entertainment, to make it sufficient to raise you from the dust, and banish those terrors and troubles from your hearts, and help you to live like the sons of God. He commandeth me to tell you, that he takes notice of your sorrows. He stands by when you see him not, and say, he hath forsaken you. He minds you with greatest tenderness, when you say, he hath forgotten you.”

The Right Method for a Settled Peace of Conscience 1

Divine Correction – William Jay of Bath – 1854

This narration is from two sermons (1) Divine Correction and (2) The Unbelief of Thomas, from Collected Works of William Jay Volume 2.  Spurgeon wrote in his autobiography, ”

While I was living at Cambridge, I once heard Mr. Jay, of Bath, preach. His text was, “Let your conversation be as it becometh the gospel of Christ.” I remember with what dignity he preached, and yet how simply. He made one remark which deeply impressed my youthful mind, and which I have never forgotten; it was this, “You do need a Mediator between yourselves and God, but you do not need a Mediator between yourselves and Christ; you may come to Him just as you are.”

Divine Correction / The Unbelief of Thomas

 

Desperate Prayers of An Awakened Sinner – Phillip Doddridge

A number of prayers edited and included in the Valley of Vision, by Arthur Bennett, are taken from The Rise and Progress of Religion in the Soul – Phillip Doddridge. Here are the actual  unedited prayers from the book, but in more modern English. Sample, ”

“Blessed Jesus, is it indeed thus? Is it not the fiction of the human mind? Surely it is not! What human mind could have invented or conceived it? It is a plain, a certain fact, that thou didst leave the magnificence and joy of the heavenly world in compassion to such a wretch as I! Oh! hadst thou from that height of dignity and felicity only looked down upon me for one moment, and sent some gracious word to me for my direction and comfort, even by the least of thy servants, justly might I have prostrated myself in grateful admiration, and have kissed ‘the very footsteps’ of him ‘that published the salvation.’

Desperate Prayers of the Awakened Sinner

Octavius Winslow – The Cure For Our Love in its Declension. 1847

A chapter from the book, Personal Declension and Revival of Religion in the Soul. ”

When God becomes less an object of fervent desire, holy delight, and frequent contemplation, we may suspect a declension of Divine love in the soul. Our spiritual views of God, and our spiritual and constant delight in him, will be materially affected by the state of our spiritual love. If there is coldness in the affections, if the mind grows earthly, carnal, and selfish, dark and gloomy shadows will gather round the character and the glory of God.

The Love of the Many Waxing Cold

Richard Alleine – A Heart of Flesh – From Heaven Opened

Richard Alleine 1611-1681

O what sorrow-bitten souls are the saints for their want of sorrow. “I mourn, Lord, I lament, I weep; but it is because I cannot mourn or lament as I should: if I could mourn as I ought, I could be comforted; if I could weep, I could rejoice; if I could sigh, I could sing; if I could lament, I could live; I die, I die, my heart dies within me, because I cannot cry; I cry, Lord, but not for sin, but for tears for sin; I cry, Lord, my calamities cry, my bones cry, my soul cries, my sins cry, ‘Lord, for a broken heart,’ and behold, yet I am not broken.

A Heart of Flesh

 

Alexander Whyte – Look to Your Motives – 1894

Preached at St. George’s Whyte says, ”

Now from all this, it follows as clear as day that our true sanctification, our true holiness of heart, our true and full and final salvation, all lie in the rectification, the simplification, and the purification of our motives. The corruption and pollution of our hearts—trace all that down to the bottom, and it all lies in our motives: in the selfishness, the unneighbourliness, the unbrotherliness, the ungodliness of our motives. We are all our own motive in all that we do: we are all our own main object and our own chief end. And it is just this that stains and debases so much that we do.”

Look To Your Motives

Thomas Sullivan – Pilgrim’s Progress – The Conversion of Hopeful

In this lesson, the conversion of Hopeful is detailed analytically and compared to historical accounts. The question that we aimed to answer is why, sometimes, there is a lengthy awakening involving conviction of sin and self seeking prior to being granted converting grace by the Spirit. What purpose does it serve, why does God often not hear the sinner’s earnest cries for salvation, or answer them at once?

Pilgrim’s Progress – The Conversion of Hopeful

Asa Cummings – The Life of Edward Payson Chapter 3

 My dear mother's fears respecting my attention to 
religions concerns were, alas but too well founded. 
Infatuated by the pleasures and amusements which 
this place affords, and which took the more powerful 
hold on my senses...
Life of Edward Payson