Category Archives: spiritual mind

John Owen – How to Set Your Affections on Things Above Chapter 2 – 1681

Owen wrote, ”

Water that rises and flows from a living spring runs equally and constantly, unless it be obstructed or diverted by some violent opposition; but that which is from thunder-showers runs furiously for a season, but is quickly dried up. So are those spiritual thoughts which arise from a prevalent internal principle of grace in the heart; they are even and constant, unless an interruption be put upon them for a season by temptations. But those which are excited by the thunder of convictions, however their streams may be filled for a season, they quickly dry up and utterly decay.”

Setting Affections on Things Above 2

John Owen – How to Set Your Affections on Things Above, Preface and Chapter 1

Owen wrote, ”

There is a being earthly minded which consists in an inordinate affection unto the things of this world. It is that which is sinful, which ought to be mortified; yet it is not absolutely inconsistent with the substance and being of the grace inquired after. Some who are really and truly spiritually minded, yet may, for a time at least, be under such an inordinate affection unto and care about earthly things, that if not absolutely, yet comparatively, as unto what they ought to be and might be, they may be justly said to be earthly minded. They are so in respect of those degrees in being spiritually minded which they ought to aim at and may attain unto. And where it is thus, this grace can never thrive or flourish, it can never advance unto any eminent degree.

Setting Affections on Things Above 1

Richard Alleine – A Heart of Flesh – From Heaven Opened

Richard Alleine 1611-1681

O what sorrow-bitten souls are the saints for their want of sorrow. “I mourn, Lord, I lament, I weep; but it is because I cannot mourn or lament as I should: if I could mourn as I ought, I could be comforted; if I could weep, I could rejoice; if I could sigh, I could sing; if I could lament, I could live; I die, I die, my heart dies within me, because I cannot cry; I cry, Lord, but not for sin, but for tears for sin; I cry, Lord, my calamities cry, my bones cry, my soul cries, my sins cry, ‘Lord, for a broken heart,’ and behold, yet I am not broken.

A Heart of Flesh

 

Alexander Whyte – The Element of Time in Our Devotions – 1896

You may be a man of a meditative, mystical, spiritual mind. Now if that is the nature of your mind, it will never come to its best out in the world, keeping late hours with the men and women of the world. No, nor even staying at home and reading, late at night, the books and papers of the world. With such a rare mind as yours is, you must be much at home, and much alone; and when you are alone you must be religiously, and spiritually, and devotionally occupied. In no other way will you ever come to the full height of your high calling.

Time Spent in Devotions

Alexander Whyte – Look to Your Motives – 1894

Preached at St. George’s Whyte says, ”

Now from all this, it follows as clear as day that our true sanctification, our true holiness of heart, our true and full and final salvation, all lie in the rectification, the simplification, and the purification of our motives. The corruption and pollution of our hearts—trace all that down to the bottom, and it all lies in our motives: in the selfishness, the unneighbourliness, the unbrotherliness, the ungodliness of our motives. We are all our own motive in all that we do: we are all our own main object and our own chief end. And it is just this that stains and debases so much that we do.”

Look To Your Motives

John Angell James – Letters to the 7 Churches Part 2 – from The Church in Earnest.

The church, though in this deplorable state, was not aware of its condition, but thought all was going on well; it did not know that it was “wretched, and miserable, and poor, and blind, and naked.” This is surprising and affecting, and shows, in an alarming view, how far self-deception may be carried, especially in the case of those, who, like the members of the church at Laodicea, are much taken up with the enjoyment of worldly prosperity. Let a professor of religion have his mind much occupied with the cares of business, and his affections much engrossed with the objects of sense, and it is astonishing how ignorant and mistaken he may remain as to the real state of his soul.

Letters to the 7 Churches – The Church in Earnest Part 2

Gisbertus Voetius – Spiritual Desertion – 1659 – Chapter One, Part One

This book is recorded – {narrated} from the title Spiritual Desertion with the kind permission of the Dutch Reformed Translation Society. www.dutchreformed.org .   It is the narrator’s opinion that it is unequaled regarding the subject in which it treats. The opinion is based on the use of the spiritual/clinical terms that are not even employed in our day. (1) because the relation of Christian experience is often more superficial (2) if the distressed is even asked to delineate them at all – often the feelings are suppressed or there is little patience to deal with these subjects at this level. (3) because the best authors are understood and quoted by this author from a bygone day that even though now are available on line are rarely consulted with the patience that is required to read the old English.  Special thanks to Reformation Heritage Books and my dear friends David Woolin, and Dr. Joel Beeke as well. Chapter one part one is the definition of terms. In this chapter the difference between melacholia and desertion are examined.

Spiritual Desertion – Chapter one Part one