Henry Scougal – Importance and Difficulty of the Ministerial Function

“You see, sirs, to what a dreadful and important charge you aspire. Consider, I beseech you, what great pains are necessary to fit you for it. It is not a knowledge of controversy, or the gift of eloquence; much less, a strong voice and bold confidence, that will prepare you for it. Your greatest work lies within, in purifying yourselves, and learn that wisdom which is necessary to win souls. Begin, I pray you, and preach to your passions, and try what good you can do to your friends and neighbors. Be not forward in rushing into public; it is better to be drawn than to run.”

Henry Scougal (1650–1678) was a Scottish theologian, pastor and author.

Importance and Difficulty of the Ministerial Function

Richard Alleine – A Heart of Flesh – From Heaven Opened

Richard Alleine 1611-1681

O what sorrow-bitten souls are the saints for their want of sorrow. “I mourn, Lord, I lament, I weep; but it is because I cannot mourn or lament as I should: if I could mourn as I ought, I could be comforted; if I could weep, I could rejoice; if I could sigh, I could sing; if I could lament, I could live; I die, I die, my heart dies within me, because I cannot cry; I cry, Lord, but not for sin, but for tears for sin; I cry, Lord, my calamities cry, my bones cry, my soul cries, my sins cry, ‘Lord, for a broken heart,’ and behold, yet I am not broken.

A Heart of Flesh

 

Life and Writings of A W Pink – Thomas Sullivan

In April of 2008, I taught Pink’s biography in Holland MI.  I was asked to teach a class of my choice to fill in for a pastor at the church June 3rd, 2018. Since I only had 23 hours, it made sense to teach on a subject I was familiar with. Because I don’t like to repeat historical subjects, I focused more on Pink’s excellent contributions in his writings to the subject of election and soteriology.

Life of A W Pink

 

George Lawson – Commentary on Proverbs 2 – 1821

“There is no viler object in nature than an adulteress. Her beauty is but a jewel of gold in a swine’s snout. Though born and baptised in a Christian land, she is to be looked upon as a heathen woman and a stranger; and as self-made brutes are greater monsters than natural brute beasts, so baptised heathens are by far the worst of pagans. Her words may be sweet and soft to the inexperienced ear of a thoughtless youth, but she is only flattering with her lips. Honey and milk seem to be under her tongue, but it is the cruel venom of dragons. She is a monster of ingratitude to that husband who was the guide and protector of her youth. All the fervours of her first love are forgotten. She returns the most cruel treatment for all that fond affection by which he bound her to him in the most endearing obligations.

Lawson, George. Exposition of the Book of Proverbs

Exposition of Proverbs 2

Alexander Whyte – The Element of Time in Our Devotions – 1896

You may be a man of a meditative, mystical, spiritual mind. Now if that is the nature of your mind, it will never come to its best out in the world, keeping late hours with the men and women of the world. No, nor even staying at home and reading, late at night, the books and papers of the world. With such a rare mind as yours is, you must be much at home, and much alone; and when you are alone you must be religiously, and spiritually, and devotionally occupied. In no other way will you ever come to the full height of your high calling.

Time Spent in Devotions

Alexander Whyte – Look to Your Motives – 1894

Preached at St. George’s Whyte says, ”

Now from all this, it follows as clear as day that our true sanctification, our true holiness of heart, our true and full and final salvation, all lie in the rectification, the simplification, and the purification of our motives. The corruption and pollution of our hearts—trace all that down to the bottom, and it all lies in our motives: in the selfishness, the unneighbourliness, the unbrotherliness, the ungodliness of our motives. We are all our own motive in all that we do: we are all our own main object and our own chief end. And it is just this that stains and debases so much that we do.”

Look To Your Motives

The Life of Adoniram Judson Part 2

This is the conclusion of the Life of Judson.  It is from the history of the death of Ann to the death of Adoniram, 1850. It details his translation work, marriage to Sarah Boardman, and after her death, Emily Chubbuck. Also his return trip to Boston.

The Life of Adoniram Judson Part 2

“As it respects ourselves,” Mrs. Judson writes, “we are busily employed all day long. I can assure you that we find much pleasure in our employment. Could you look into a large, open room, which we call a veranda, you would see Mr. Judson bent over his table, covered with Burman books, with his teacher at his side, a venerable-looking man in his sixtieth year, with a cloth wrapped round his middle, and a handkerchief round his head. They talk and chatter all day long, with hardly any cessation.”

Judson, Edward. The life of Adoniram Judson

Part 1 is here

Thomas Sullivan – The Life of Adoniram Judson 1788-1850

 

 

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